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Occupation classifications
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Occupation classifications are classification systems to structure occupations according to different attributes and characteristics. An important example for this is the International Standard Occupation Classification (ISCO), developed by the International Labour Organization (ILO) for the first time in the 1960s as an international classification system of occupation groups. It has been adapted twice to the changes in the working environment in the industrial nations in 1988 and 2008 (ISCO-88 and ISCO-08). Based on this classification, international comparison enables the determination of different positions in a society’s hierarchy, including comparable statistics about different labour markets, education systems, unemployment rates, etc. There are nine main occupation categories (without armed forces occupations) in the International Standard Classification of Occupations  of 1988 by Eurostat (for the purpose of the European Union). These main occupation categories are organized into occupation groups, sub-groups and types, which leads to a four-digit code for each occupation to enable assigning it to an occupation type. UK & Ireland Additional to ISCO, there are other classification systems in use, e.g. the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) 2010 in the UK and Ireland. SOC has its own structure, which is not based on ISCO-08. However, a mapping to ISCO-08 is available, which enables comparison between the two classification systems. Other national classification systems such as NOC (Canada) are based on ISCO. USA The Occupational Information Network (O*Net) in the USA is supported by the US Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). It is related to the UK occupation classification SOC. O*Net is a broad database of occupation descriptions and the respective skills, competences, etc. needed for each of them. Each occupation is structured into Tasks, Tools used, Kowledge, Skills, Ability, Work Activities, Work Context, Job Zone. Additional important classification systems exist in various regions and countries worldwide, e.g. ANZSCO, ASCO, BO&C, KldB, Ö-ISCO, and many more.
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Occupation classifications
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Occupation classifications are classification systems to structure occupations according to different attributes and characteristics. An important example for this is the International Standard Occupation Classification (ISCO), developed by the International Labour Organization (ILO) for the first time in the 1960s as an international classification system of occupation groups. It has been adapted twice to the changes in the working environment in the industrial nations in 1988 and 2008 (ISCO-88 and ISCO-08). Based on this classification, international comparison enables the determination of different positions in a society’s hierarchy, including comparable statistics about different labour markets, education systems, unemployment rates, etc. There are nine main occupation categories (without armed forces occupations) in the International Standard Classification of Occupations  of 1988 by Eurostat (for the purpose of the European Union). These main occupation categories are organized into occupation groups, sub-groups and types, which leads to a four-digit code for each occupation to enable assigning it to an occupation type. UK & Ireland Additional to ISCO, there are other classification systems in use, e.g. the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) 2010 in the UK and Ireland. SOC has its own structure, which is not based on ISCO-08. However, a mapping to ISCO-08 is available, which enables comparison between the two classification systems. Other national classification systems such as NOC (Canada) are based on ISCO. USA The Occupational Information Network (O*Net) in the USA is supported by the US Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). It is related to the UK occupation classification SOC. O*Net is a broad database of occupation descriptions and the respective skills, competences, etc. needed for each of them. Each occupation is structured into Tasks, Tools used, Kowledge, Skills, Ability, Work Activities, Work Context, Job Zone. Additional important classification systems exist in various regions and countries worldwide, e.g. ANZSCO, ASCO, BO&C, KldB, Ö-ISCO, and many more.
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